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Scarring: The story of our lives told on our skin

Forget wearing your heart on your sleeve, you wear the story of your life on your skin. The skin is the body’s largest organ, which is subjected to numerous traumas over a lifetime which leave enduring marks, such as bites, burns, rashes, acne attacks , injuries and surgical incisions. By protecting your skin and treating it well you can help stop a disfiguring scar from becoming inevitable and permanent.  Dr Joshua Fox founder and director of New York & New Jersey-based Advanced Dermatology, PC & the Centre for Laser & Cosmetic Surgery states "We now have some keys ways to help prevent scars, and even treat existing scars so they’re much less noticeable.”


How scars form


There are many contributing factors that determine the formation of a scar. These can include:

  • The depth of the injury. The deeper the impact of the trauma on the skin increases the risk of scarring. If you suffer a deep cut or burn on your face, it is wise to consult a doctor for stitches to decrease the scale of scarring.
  • Acne. Acne is a major cause of scarring; popping a pimple maybe a great temporary solution to improve the appearance of spots, but in the long run, it can cause permanent marks on the surface of your skin. If you have squeezed your spots and have been left with acne scarring, help is at hand.
  • Terproline products provide key ingredients to replace damaged collagen and elastin, it triggers the breakdown of the scar collagen and provides the skin with the means to replace this with new smooth elastic skin. In the meantime a great product to use to dramatically reduce the size of your pimples rapidly without the risk of acne scarring, would be the Aknicare range, especially the Skin Roller, a product specifically designed to reduce a large spot quickly before scarring can occur. It can reduce a spot in a matter of hours, this provides rapid relief to keep your pimples at bay. To prevent a breakout altogether try using one of SkinMed’s tailored-for-you acne busting product sets.
  • Trauma Location. There are areas of the body that are more prone to scarring than elsewhere, such as the middle of the chest, the earlobe and the tip of the shoulder. Scars that form on the joints are often more visible due to the stretching and movement during the healing process.
  • Age. A person’s age is a major contributor that determines the formation of a scar. The older you get the less capable your cells are at efficiently carrying out the wound-healing process and the skin takes longer to heal. Younger people heal more rapidly and in a lot of cases this can trigger an over healing response leading to hypertrophic or raised scars.
  • Family history and skin tone play a vital role in your proneness to an overly aggressive healing process. When this occurs, you can develop elevated hypertrophic and in some even keloid scars. The NHS describes this process "Collagen gathers around the damage and builds up to help the wound seal over. The resulting scar usually fades over time, becoming smoother and less noticeable. However, some scars don't stop growing. They 'invade' the surrounding healthy skin and become bigger than the original wound. These are known as keloid scars”. You have a greater risk of developing keloids if you have darker skin.
  • Infection. Ensure you thoroughly clean the wound at the time of trauma and ensure that all foreign bodies, for example glass and dirt particles, are removed from the area. If the wound becomes infected, more white blood cells disburse to the trauma site and are more likely to leave traces of their presence in the form of more severe scarring.
  • Hard Scabs. It is essential not to pick¸ this will not only remove the scab but you are also stripping away new skin cells which delays healing, doubling the risk of scarring.

 

Created On  6 Oct 2015 15:23  -  Permalink

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